Posts Tagged ‘wall street bombing’



Journal of American History, 2009

By James Green. Beverly Gage has written a richly detailed and superbly rendered history of one of the worst—and most neglected—terrorist bombings in American history: the dynamite explosion of September 16, 1920, that killed thirty-eight people on Wall Street. Although all but erased from public memory (and ignored by historians until now), the event was sensational news in 1920 and remained so for the next two years during a series of fruitless and often bizarre investigations that failed to solve the mystery of who planted the bomb. Read more....


Chicago Tribune, April 4, 2009

By David L. Chappell. Americans often say they lost their complacency and innocence on 9/ll. Wait a minute, Beverly Gage's new history rings out like an alarm clock: We have been here before. Gage startles us with the thought that we should have lost something more important than our innocence on 9/ll: our amnesia about our rich prior experience with terrorism. Read the rest....





“Terrorism and the American Experience,” Journal of American History, June 2011

In 1970, just months before his death, the historian Richard Hofstadter called on U.S. historians to engage the subject of violence. For a generation, he wrote, the profession had ignored the issue, assuming that consensus rather than conflict had shaped the American past. By the late 1960s, with assassinations, riots, and violent crime at the forefront of national anxieties, that assumption was no longer tenable. Everywhere, Americans seemed to be thinking and talking about violence, except within the historical profession. Hofstadter urged historians to remedy their “ inattention ” and construct a history of violence that would speak to both the present and the past. Over the last four decades, the historical profession has responded to that challenge. Studies of racial conflict, territorial massacres, gendered violence, empire, crime and punishment, and war and memory make up some of the most esteemed books of the past generation. Yet on the subject of “ terrorism, ” the form of violence that currently dominates American political discourse, historians have had comparatively little to say. Read article. Read round-table. Review teaching resources. Listen to the podcast....